· 

PALMER Clarence L., Tec4, 784th Engineer Petroleum Distribution Company

The story of a pipeline, from the Mediterranean to Germany

 

       Clarence L. PALMER was born on July 16, 1911 in North Platte, Nebraska. He was incorporated on July 24, 1943 at Fort Brook, Nebraska. Incorporated into the 784th Engineer Petroleum Distribution Company. He will serve as automotive mechanic with the rank of Technician 4 (T4). On March 31, 1944 he was transferred with his unit to the European theater of operation more precisely in Italy, in preparation for the landing in Provence.

 

Clarence PALMER, 784th Engineer Petroleum Distribution Company
Clarence PALMER, 784th Engineer Petroleum Distribution Company

The Seventh Army engineer POL plan for DRAGOON, formulated in early summer 1944 at Naples under Lt. Col. Charles L. Lockett, drew on the successful experience with pipelines gained in the North African and Italian campaigns. The engineers envisioned a pipeline system up the Rhone River valley, making use of the already existing refinery installations in Toulon, Marseille, and smaller ports at the river mouth. Depending on the damage done by the retreating Germans, the engineers could easily support the troops battling in the beachhead area with a gallon of gasoline per man per day, the consumption rate established in earlier campaigns. But the rapid success of the invasion altered the sequence and timing of fuel depot construction and accelerated the schedule for laying of the pipeline north. Demands for gasoline skyrocketed; every truck moving forward off the beaches took with it as many jerry cans as it could hold, but advance units were still sending convoys on 300-mile round trips back to the beach dumps for resupply as the Seventh Army pursued the fleeing German Nineteenth Army to the north.


The 697th Engineer Petroleum Distribution Company was the first of its kind ashore, landing at Camel Green on D-day. Capt. Carl W. Bills, commanding the unit, was among the foremost POL experts in the theater, a man of wide prewar experience in the Oklahoma oil fields; despite his relatively low rank, he became the technical supervisor of the whole fuel pipeline system up the Rhone valley. The company entered St. Raphael as soon as the town was cleared, surveying for a pipeline in that area. Various detachments collected enough petroleum pumping equipment to begin construction and operations, but spent several days retrieving materiel coming to the invasion beaches in scattered lots on small.

On 26 August the 697th began the construction of a nineteen-mile, four-inch-diameter victaulic pipe for 80-octane fuel to connect the refineries of L’Avera at Port-de-Bouc; La Provence at La Mede, three miles east of Martigues on the southern edge of the lake; and the large Bruni oil refining complex on the north shore of the Etang de Berre. A second four-inch line for 100-octane gasoline paralleled the first between Port-de-Bouc and La Mede, where the company built a 1,000-barrel storage tank.

In the foreground, a section of the vitaulic pipeline, in the Rhone Valley.
In the foreground, a section of the vitaulic pipeline, in the Rhone Valley.

In their four-year occupation the Germans had depleted the supply of coupling joints to match the French fittings within the refineries; the engineers were able to maintain an adequate supply only after the establishment of the engineer dump at Le Pas-des-Lanciers. The occupiers did leave behind a valuable source of expertise in the French former employees of the oil plants and the Vichy government fuel-rationing authorities. After the elimination of collaborators among them, these Frenchmen provided a ready and experienced supplement for Allied manpower and facilitated military and essential civilian fuel distribution.



With the discharge areas intact and the first inter-terminal line wholly operational by 12 September, the company had already begun the pipeline covering the thirty-five miles between Berre and the Durance River. The line reached Salon, eight miles north of Berre and the site of a large convoy refueling and jerry can refill point, in the first week of construction and by 25 September was at the south bank of the Durance, five miles southeast of Avignon. Here, pushing the pipe across on a 1,480-foot timber trestle, the 697th passed the line to the 784th Engineer Petroleum Distribution Company, which linked it to their completed section. It covered the next thirty-two miles north to the French railroad tank car installation at Le Pontet, the second large decanting station for refueling of truck convoys. Accompanying the engineer pipeline along its whole length was a Signal Corps telephone net that permitted prompt reporting of pipeline leaks.

By early September, the press of operations forced the establishment of a provisional battalion-level supervisory headquarters to coordinate and control the pipelaying and operating activities of eight distribution companies, several attached companies from engineer combat regiments, and one dump truck company. First commanded by Maj. Charles B. Gholson, the unit finally was designated 408th Engineer Service Battalion (Pipeline) on 6 January 1945. It allowed the rapid transfer of supervisory talent among the operating battalion headquarters, the distribution companies, the Delta Base Section, and Continental Advance Section (CONAD) or SOLOC commands as the construction effort demanded. The headquarters also relieved the individual companies of the need to obtain their own supply of pipes, couplings, and pump gear from the harbors in southern France. The battalion tied its wholesale supply to the French rail net, placing stocks of pipe in rail sidings close to the line of construction at roughly twenty-mile intervals.
     After connecting the pipe on the north bank of the Durance, the 784th took responsibility for testing and operating the whole line from Berre to Le Pontet. Meanwhile, the 697th leapfrogged ahead to install the next section of pipe into the rehabilitated French storage tanks at Lyon, with dispensing points at St. Marcel, Vienne, and Lyon itself. By 9 November the pipe was moving nearly 13,000 barrels of fuel daily, a rate maintained until the end of the war on the Rhone River valley pipeline.    

784th Engineer Petroleum Distribution Company near Le Pontet
784th Engineer Petroleum Distribution Company near Le Pontet

Meanwhile, other petroleum engineer units arrived at Marseille and Port-de-Bouc to continue refurbishing and operating the bulk ports there. The 1379th Engineer Petroleum Distribution Company entered Marseille on 29 August after landing six days earlier at St. Raphael. The fierce battle for Marseille had done little damage to the petroleum facilities, and the company had pipelines running from the quays to the largest refinery at the Rue de Lyon within a week. One group left behind on Corsica to train French petroleum units rejoined the company on 17 September, with detachments in Port-de-Bouc, Marseille, La Mede, and Berre, the 1379th took over the whole tanker discharge operation in southern France and began the construction of a six-inch line around the Etang de Berre as the beginning of a new system to parallel the earlier four-inch pipe. The 696th Engineer Petroleum Distribution Company arrived at Berre on the twenty-first to carry the six-inch pipe to just above Avignon. The 701st Engineer Petroleum Distribution Company, another highly experienced unit from the Italian campaign, arrived at Marseille on 9 October and moved the work ahead from Avignon to Piolenc; there, the 696th took over again to a point above Valence.

The Rhone river overflowing
The Rhone river overflowing

In late October the Rhone overflowed its banks after heavy rains. The two companies constructing the line up the riverbank south of Lyon had to float pipe into position by plugging one end of it and moving it into the heavy flood waters. A detachment of the 701st downstream repaired the severed four-inch line at Livron. In November, progress on both lines came to a temporary halt when an early freeze blocked the pipes and burst couplings on a stretch between Lyon and Macon—water used to test the pipe before pumping fuel through it had been left in the pipe during a sudden temperature drop. The 697th and the 701st backtracked, hastily thawed the line, and replaced broken sections, allowing operation to resume by 23 November.

The combined work of the 696th and the 697th Engineer Petroleum Distribution Companies and Companies E and F of the 335th Engineer General Service Regiment brought the operational four-inch pipe to the rear of the Seventh Army area at La Forge, near Sarrebourg, on 12 February 1945, although construction was slowed by heavy snow. The six-inch pipe lagged behind north of Vesoul, plagued by an inadequate supply of parts and faulty construction that had to be rechecked. The six-inch pipe became operational to the La Forge terminal on 3 April, while the 697th was overseeing the last leg of four-inch pipe construction in three parallel lines from La Forge through Sarreguemines and Frankenthal, Germany, and across the Rhine near Mannheim into the terminal at Sandhofen, a Mannheim suburb. Another seven miles of six-inch pipe, erected by the 1385th Engineer Petroleum Distribution Company under the supervision of the 697th experts and the 408th Engineer Service Battalion, connected the Frankenthal and Mannheim terminals.
      On 26 February 1945, in the general consolidation of supply operations under ETOUSA, Lt. Gen. John C. H. Lee, commanding the Communications Zone (COMZ), ETOUSA, took under his ultimate authority the petroleum distribution net in southern France along with the pipelines constructed across the northern tier of the Continent. Operations records were turned over to the ETOUSA Military Pipeline Service after 26 February, and the 408th Engineer Service Battalion and its attached units came under the operational control of the ETOUSA staff, though still attached to CONAD for supply and administration. The construction companies remained relatively autonomous through all of the centralizing and remained in place to continue the operation of the 875 miles of four-inch and 532 miles of six-inch pipeline they had emplaced behind the 6th Army Group in the advance from southern France.

     On December 18, 1945, Clarence PALMER and his unit returned to the United States. He will be demobilized on May 1, 1946, after three years of service. He will be a car mechanic in civilian life.

PALMER Clarence and his D 7 Caterpillar
PALMER Clarence and his D 7 Caterpillar
Clarence PALMER and Eliette CALVIER for their wedding the 8th February 1946
Clarence PALMER and Eliette CALVIER for their wedding the 8th February 1946

    Clarence L. PALMER est née le 16 juillet 1911 à North Platte, Nebraska. Il a été incorporé le 24 juillet 1943 à Fort Brook, Nebraska. Intégré à la 784th Engineer Petroleum Distribution Company. Il sera mécanicien automobile avec le grade de technicien 4 (T4). Le 31 mars 1944, il est transféré avec son unité sur le théâtre d'opération européen plus précisément en Italie, en préparation du débarquement en Provence.

      Le plan POL du génie de la Septième Armée pour DRAGOON, est mis en place au début de l'été 1944 à Naples par le lieutenant-colonel Charles L. Lockett, qui s'inspira de l'expérience avec les pipelines acquise lors des campagnes nord-africaine et italienne qui furent des réussites. Le génie envisage un système de pipelines dans la vallée du Rhône, utilisant les installations de raffinerie déjà existantes à Toulon, Marseille et les petits ports à l'embouchure du fleuve. En fonction des dégâts causés par les Allemands en retraite, les ingénieurs pourraient facilement soutenir les troupes combattant dans la zone de la tête de pont avec un gallon d'essence par homme et par jour, le taux de consommation établi lors des campagnes précédentes. Mais le succès rapide de l'invasion a modifié la séquence et le calendrier de construction du dépôt de carburant et accéléré le calendrier de pose du gazoduc vers le nord. Les demandes d'essence ont monté en flèche; chaque camion qui se déplaçait hors des plages emportait avec lui autant de jerricans que possible, mais les unités avancées envoyaient toujours des convois pour des trajets de 300 milles vers les décharges de la plage pour le ravitaillement alors que la septième armée poursuivait la dix-neuvième armée allemande en fuite vers le nord.

     La 697th Engineer Petroleum Distribution Company était la première du genre à terre, atterrissant à Camel Green le jour J. Le capitaine Carl W. Bills, commandant l'unité, était parmi les plus grands experts du POL dans le théâtre méditérranéen, un homme ayant une vaste expérience d'avant-guerre dans les champs pétroliers de l'Oklahoma; en dépit de son rang relativement bas, il est devenu le superviseur technique de l'ensemble du réseau de pipelines de carburant dans la vallée du Rhône. La compagnie est entrée à Saint-Raphaël dès que la ville a été nettoyée, recherchant un pipeline dans cette zone. Divers détachements ont collecté suffisamment de matériel de pompage de pétrole pour commencer la construction et les opérations, mais ont passé plusieurs jours à récupérer le matériel arrivant sur les plages d'invasion en lots dispersés à droite et à gauche.

August 1944, An engineer petroleum company about to land in St Raphael.
August 1944, An engineer petroleum company about to land in St Raphael.

Le 26 août, le 697th a commencé la construction d'un tuyau victaulic (système d'assemblage de raccords de tuyaux rainurés) de 30km, et de quatre pouces de diamètre pour le carburant 80-octane afin de relier les raffineries de L'Avera à Port-de-Bouc; La Provence à La Mede, à cinq kilomètres à l'est de Martigues, au bord sud du lac; et le grand complexe de raffinage du pétrole Bruni sur la rive nord de l'étang de Berre. Une deuxième ligne de quatre pouces pour l'essence 100 octane était parallèle à la première entre Port-de-Bouc et La Mede, où la société a construit un réservoir de stockage de 1000 barils.

 

Au cours de leur occupation de quatre ans, les Allemands avaient épuisé l'offre de joints de couplage correspondant aux raccords français dans les raffineries; les ingénieurs n'ont pu maintenir un approvisionnement suffisant qu'après la mise en place du dépot du génie US Pas-des-Lanciers. Les occupants ont laissé derrière eux une précieuse source d'expertise chez les anciens salariés français des usines pétrolières et les autorités gouvernementales de Vichy en matière de rationnement du carburant. Après l'élimination de leurs collaborateurs, ces Français ont fourni un soutien expérimenté pour la main-d'œuvre alliée et facilité la distribution de carburant militaire et civil qui était essentielle.

     Avec les zones de rejet intactes et la première ligne inter-terminale entièrement opérationnelle au 12 septembre, la société avait déjà commencé l'oléoduc couvrant les trente-cinq milles entre Berre et la Durance. La ligne a atteint Salon, à 13 km au nord de Berre et le site d'un grand point de ravitaillement en carburant et de recharge de jerricans, au cours de la première semaine de construction et, le 25 septembre, à atteint la rive sud de la Durance, à 8 km au sud-est d'Avignon. Ici, poussant le tuyau sur un chevalet en bois de 1 480 pieds, le 697th a passé la ligne au 784th Engineer Petroleum Distribution Company, qui l'a lié à leur section terminée. Il a couvert les 50km suivants au nord de l'installation de wagons-citernes du chemin de fer français à Le Pontet, la deuxième grande station de décantation pour le ravitaillement en carburant des convois de camions. Un réseau téléphonique du Signal Corps accompagnait le pipeline du génie sur toute sa longueur, ce qui permettait de signaler rapidement les fuites du pipeline.

Clarence PALMER with a young girl somewhere in southern france.
Clarence PALMER with a young girl somewhere in southern france.

    Début septembre, la presse des opérations a forcé la création d'un quartier général de supervision provisoire au niveau du bataillon pour coordonner et contrôler les activités de pose de canalisations et d'exploitation de huit sociétés de distribution, de plusieurs sociétés affiliées des régiments de combat du génie et d'une société de camions à benne. Commandée par le major Charles B. Gholson, l'unité a finalement été désignée 408th Engineer Service Battalion (Pipeline) le 6 janvier 1945. Elle a permis le transfert rapide de talents de supervision entre le quartier général du bataillon opérationnel, les sociétés de distribution, la Delta Base Section, et les commandes de la Continental Advance Section (CONAD) ou du SOLOC selon les efforts de construction demandés. Le siège a également déchargé les entreprises individuelles de la nécessité d'obtenir leur propre approvisionnement en tuyaux, raccords et engrenages de pompe dans les ports du sud de la France. Le bataillon a lié son approvisionnement en gros au réseau ferroviaire français, plaçant des stocks de tuyaux dans des voies d'évitement près de la ligne de construction à des intervalles d'environ vingt milles.
     Après avoir raccordé la canalisation sur la rive nord de la Durance, le 784th a pris la responsabilité de tester et d'exploiter toute la ligne de Berre à Le Pontet. Pendant ce temps, le 697th bondit en avant pour installer la prochaine section de tuyau dans les réservoirs de stockage français réhabilités à Lyon, avec des points de distribution à Saint-Marcel, Vienne et Lyon même. Le 9 novembre, le tuyau transportait quotidiennement près de 13 000 barils de carburant, un taux maintenu jusqu'à la fin de la guerre sur l'oléoduc de la vallée du Rhône.
     Parallèlement, d'autres unités d'ingénieurs pétroliers sont arrivées à Marseille et à Port-de-Bouc pour poursuivre la rénovation et l'exploitation des ports de vrac. La 1379th Engineer Petroleum Distribution Company est entrée à Marseille le 29 août après avoir débarqué six jours plus tôt à Saint-Raphaël. La bataille acharnée pour Marseille n'a causé que peu de dommages aux installations pétrolières, et la société a eu des pipelines allant des quais à la plus grande raffinerie de la rue de Lyon en une semaine. Un groupe laissé sur la Corse pour former des unités pétrolières françaises a rejoint l'entreprise le 17 septembre, avec des détachements à Port-de-Bouc, Marseille, La Mede et Berre, le 1379th a repris l'ensemble de l'opération de déchargement des pétroliers dans le sud de la France et a commencé la la construction d'une ligne de six pouces autour de l'étang de Berre comme début d'un nouveau système pour mettre en parallèle le précédent tuyau de quatre pouces. Le 696th Engineer Petroleum Distribution Company est arrivé à Berre le 21 pour porter le tuyau de six pouces juste au-dessus d'Avignon. La 701st Engineer Petroleum Distribution Company, autre unité très expérimentée de la campagne d'Italie, est arrivée à Marseille le 9 octobre et a déplacé les travaux d'Avignon à Piolenc; là, le 696th reprend le dessus à un point au-dessus de Valence.

On the way to Lyon, what is left by the german army retreating.
On the way to Lyon, what is left by the german army retreating.

     Fin octobre, le Rhône a débordé de ses berges après de fortes pluies. Les deux sociétés qui construisent la ligne au bord de la rivière au sud de Lyon ont dû flotter le tuyau en position en le bouchant à une extrémité et en le déplaçant dans les eaux de crue. Un détachement du 701st en aval a réparé la ligne coupée de quatre pouces à Livron. En novembre, les progrès sur les deux lignes ont été temporairement interrompus lorsqu'un gel précoce a bloqué les tuyaux et a brisé les raccords sur un tronçon entre Lyon et Macon - l'eau utilisée pour tester le tuyau avant de pomper du carburant à travers elle avait été laissée dans le tuyau pendant une soudaine baisse de température. Le 697th et le 701st ont fait marche arrière, ont dégelé à la hâte la ligne et remplacé les sections cassées, permettant à l'opération de reprendre avant le 23 novembre.
Les travaux combinés du 696th et du 697th Engineer Petroleum Distribution Companies et des compagnies E et F du 335th Engineer General Service Regiment ont amené le tuyau opérationnel de quatre pouces à l'arrière de la 7e armée à La Forge, près de Sarrebourg, le 12 février. 1945, bien que la construction soit ralentie par de fortes chutes de neige. Le tuyau de six pouces a pris du retard au nord de Vesoul, en proie à un approvisionnement insuffisant en pièces et à une construction défectueuse qui a dû être revérifiée. Le tuyau de six pouces est devenu opérationnel vers le terminal de La Forge le 3 avril, tandis que le 697th supervisait la dernière étape de la construction de tuyaux de quatre pouces dans trois lignes parallèles de La Forge à Sarreguemines et Frankenthal, en Allemagne, et de l'autre côté du Rhin près de Mannheim. dans le terminal de Sandhofen, une banlieue de Mannheim. Un autre sept miles de tuyau de six pouces, érigé par la 1385th Engineer Petroleum Distribution Company sous la supervision des 697th experts et du 408th Engineer Service Battalion, reliait les terminaux de Frankenthal et de Mannheim.
      Le 26 février 1945, lors de la consolidation générale des opérations d'approvisionnement sous ETOUSA, le lieutenant-général John CH Lee, commandant la zone de communications (COMZ), ETOUSA, a pris sous son autorité ultime le filet de distribution de pétrole dans le sud de la France ainsi que les pipelines construits. à travers le niveau nord du continent. Les dossiers d'exploitation ont été remis au service de pipelines militaires d'ETOUSA après le 26 février, et le 408th Engineer Service Battalion et ses unités attachées sont passés sous le contrôle opérationnel du personnel d'ETOUSA, bien qu'ils soient toujours rattachés au CONAD pour l'approvisionnement et l'administration. Les entreprises de construction sont restées relativement autonomes pendant toute la phase de centralisation et sont restées en place pour poursuivre l'exploitation des 875 milles de pipeline de quatre pouces et 532 milles de six pouces qu'ils avaient mis en place derrière le 6e Groupe d'armées dans l'avance du sud de la France.

     Le 18 décembre 1945, Clarence PALMER et son unité retournent aux États-Unis. Il sera démobilisé le 1er mai 1946, après trois ans de service. Le service des armées lui laisse le droit de retourner en France pour épouser Eliette CALVIER le 8 février 1946, une française qu'il à rencontré lors de la bataille de Derbières la Coucourde dans la Drôme. A son retour dans la vie civile, il travaille de 1947 a 1955 a McClellan Airforce Base a Sacramento California comme Fourmen sur moteur d'avion.

De 1955 a 1957 il monte une société de paysagiste.
Pendant ce temps il s'inscrit a la De Vry Technical institute pour des cours par correspondance pour apprendre à réparer des radios et télévisions. De 1957 a 1960, il travaille pour la société Aerojet a Sacramento California,de 1960 a 1963 il ouvre un magasin de vente et de réparation pour les télévisions et radios à Sacramento, il en ouvre un deuxième à West Sacramento.
De 1963 a 1971 il gére une vingtaine de magasins de laverie et de lavage à Secet. Là il doit prendre sa retraite suite à un triple pontage puis il rejoint sa femme et ses deux enfants Rougeoies en France. Il décedera le 10 Mars 1989, dans l'Ardeche.

SOURCE : Riky and Alan PALMER ; http://www.6thcorpscombatengineers.com

Écrire commentaire

Commentaires: 2
  • #1

    Palmer Riky (mercredi, 06 mai 2020 13:42)

    Bravo pour cette superbe page et la précision des informations

  • #2

    Alan Leroy Pamer (mercredi, 06 mai 2020 16:04)

    Bravo pour cette superbe page.